Story Resolutions: Mastering the Happy-Sad Ending – by Gilbert Bassey…

A great blog as I related it to A Year in the Life of Leah Brand as I didn’t want the usual tie up soppy happy ending but to leave the reader wondering. Did I do right or wrong? Who knows but it bothered a lot of people. The answer is in book 2, if you’fre curious. 🙂

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

on Writers Helping Writers:

It was 10pm, and I was trying to sleep when my door flew open and my sister came in, wailing like a wounded puppy. “Why did you kill him?”

I cleared the sleep from my eyes. “What the hell are you talking about?”

“Michael! You killed Michael!”

At that, I couldn’t help myself from laughing. Not a nice thing, I know.

Curiously, she went ahead to profess love for the story—particularly the ending that made her cry. Fascinating, right? My story was able to create such a strong emotional reaction because it avoided the safety of a happy ending and the depression of a sad ending. Instead, it opted for the more fulfilling happy-sad resolution.

Why Happy-Sad Endings?

Before we answer the question of why, let’s explore the story endings that we commonly see. To put it bluntly,

  • A sad ending is when the story ends…

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