AM I WASTING MY TIME?

I have come to the following conclusion.

Not all books that hit the charts are good.

A lot of excellent books never sell.

You can become a NYT bestseller by targeting carefully and working the system.

What is the difference?

Marketing – which equals getting your book/s out there and VISIBLE, really  VISIBLE.

Now before you read any further don’t think for a moment that I am whining. I applaud and admire those people who have the marketing skill. I may or may not write good books, depending on your point of view (you can see them below!) but I ain’t got the marketing skill, nor do I have the money to pay some person or organisation to do it for me. I cannot even railroad DH into doing any of it either. (you may say aaaah here)

I receive dozens of blogs each week telling me how only Facebook ads work, no, wait, it’s Amazon adds that do the trick.

Twitter – tweet every fifteen minutes and you’ll hit the best sellers. Yeah right, but how do you get people to follow you and who is going to pay for the alarm clock to wake you through the night to send those tweets every quarter of an hour? Oh, there are automatic schedulers? Great, they cost? Ah!

amie-series-5-march-2017

Book promos, “you can’t make sales unless you get your book out there in front of the millions on our mail list and for today only we are offering a 1% discount” – yeah, right!!  Some good, some bad. But then author X sold hundreds on Promo A and when it came to your turn, you scraped in ten. Hmmm.

Book Bub is the only one you make any money on, you do have a spare $600 don’t you? – in the hope your one free book will entice readers to buy the rest of the series. (Do bear in mind your average review rating will go down, it’s a no holds barred audience out there who will download and cheerfully give you a 1 * rating). Is it only writers who will beg a company to accept the equivalent of half a month’s wages to allow BB to include your free book on their list on one particular day only?

salary-slips

List your books on every site you can find, blast the FB groups. Whoops, they dropped down the page way out of sight in seconds didn’t they?

No! Only Pinterest will bring in the sales – widen your audience. Try all the other social media as well and do linger to chat, make friends, what else would you do with your time but write more books?

Let’s have a swap, I’ll promote your book if you’ll promote mine – could work, but then her fans only read vampire stories and yours are sweet Christian romances.

Throw an online party, especially when you have a pre-order up, get hundreds involved – give away free books, bags, pens, bookmarks, t-shirts, shopping bags, any swag will do, don’t even think about the cost of posting, why spoil it?

pens

Pay for ‘how to’ books, or cough up fees to experts who did it and can let you into the secret of their success (note, theirs, not yours).

Reviews, you can’t sell books or get promos without reviews, dozens and dozens and dozens of them!! Go out, find people who don’t know you, are not friends, probably don’t read and browbeat them into scribbling a few lines in the right places telling the world how good your books are. Alternatively, join a review group, read lots of books you would never, ever have checked out of your local library, slobber over them, or, you can give yours away for free to strangers who may or not review once they have their paws on your precious manuscript.

Competitions enter as many as you can find on google, it’s only after you realize a) how expensive they are b) most of them are listed in the Watchdog site as decidedly dodgy c) cough up extra money for the certificate and the stickers d) fight them off for a year as they try to sell you promotional material, or embroil you in a popularity contest making you beg and plead with all your friends to vote for you – a good, bad or indifferent book doesn’t even feature here. But the stickers look great and there is a tremendous sense of satisfaction – unless it turns all your other now ex-writer friends green with envy.

Media! That’s the way to go – get on radio, even better try the TV (forget Oprah that costs a fortune and chances are minimal unless you are best friends with the producer). OK, come down to earth and try the local press, fabulous spread for the cost of a book, wait for sales to hit the heights. They didn’t? Oh. After the radio show then? Was anyone listening?

Get a #1 bestseller sticker. Oh, you got one? How long ago? And now? Yes I know, blink and they’ve gone, and now you’re sliding back down the rankings. Shame.

A web site, Oh My God you don’t have a web site, you need one now! You can’t sell books without a web site. It’s really easy, you can do it yourself. Oh, where are the 3D graphics and the swirling psychedelic images? You must to buy this graphics package, and it will only take six months to crack it.

Blog, blog and then blog some more – only you mustn’t mention your book too often, make friends first and then casually, after a couple of years, drop into the conversation one day that you have written a book or two, or three, or four, or five.

Build your own mailing list, the perfect and only answer. Send out begging tweets and FB posts please sign up here is the link (http://eepurl.com/cBu4Sf) yes that’s mine and I’m begging and grovelling in the hope you will sign up (why am I the only one in the group with less than 20K followers who would pay for a bus ticket those other authors have scribbled on.) Ah, problems with your mail provider, you didn’t get subscribers to sign in fifty times and send in a pint of blood? Ah, got cut off? Try upgrading, it doesn’t cost all that much.

By now you have lost all sense of decorum – rather like the change between your first and last maternity appointment – “it’s natural, normal and every day, so stop being such a wuss, take your clothes off!” You have morphed from a shy, reserved, quiet writer into a loud mouthed, pushy virago swallowing bucketfuls of Prozac in your desperation to make your books visible. They never warned you about that did they?

pills

A final word – before you press that button to publish, order in the Prozac, Valium or anti-depressant of your choice and wait for the nervous breakdown.

I’ve tried all of these. What has worked for you? Has anything shot you up next to the great scribes? Please let me know.

And while I’m at it, here are my books –

new-amie-i-with-medals-thumbnailchild-of-africa-new-cover-front-75dpiamie-3-coveruae-with-5-star-review-medaltlp-front-cover-titlemtlp-cover-v4-small-pic3woe-ver9-1-silver-award-front-cover-75dpi-jpg-small-for-kindle

and my web site of course http://lucindaeclarkeauthor.com

 

151 thoughts on “AM I WASTING MY TIME?

    • Of course we are all wasting our time. Back in the day when there were 300 million residents in this US of A there were approximately 300 individuals who made their living solely by writing fiction. A one in a million proposition. In that era the door to being a published author was controlled entirely by the publishing houses and the catch 22 was that you couldn’t get published without an agent and you couldn’t get an agent unless you were published. Today, thanks to digital on demand publishing, there are millions of published authors, each of us unable to stand out in such a sea of titles and all of us the natural prey for an untold number of “experts” who will guarantee sales if we buy their product or follow their procedure. If I had a reasonable solution i wouldn’t be writing this, I’d be too busy in the counting house. I won’t clutter this space with my different links. I write as Rick Fontes. If you are visiting Amazon and curious, just put in my name. And now I shall go back to wasting some more time with my latest in progress work. Happy scribbling to us all.

      Liked by 4 people

  1. Have you been creeping around spying on me?
    It was me you were talking about, wasn’t it?
    Oh, you were talking about yourself…?
    Well, I’ve just run out of Prozac, so be a sweety and post some to me.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Noooooo! I think your books are great and deserve to be bestsellers. However DHL (Drop it Hide it and Lose it) have left with your lastest consignment of Prozac, should be with you by Christmas. 🙂

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      • Thanks, you’re a true Superstar. (I won’t ask which Christmas. Oh, you’ve not been sending out your marketing letters through them, have you? Could account for a lot. 🙂 )

        Liked by 2 people

  2. I feel your pain Lucinda, but came to a decision last year, that at the end of the day I was finally in my life doing something that was on my terms, that I loved waking up in the morning and opening my blog and also the next chapter of the book I was writing and that the community around me was one of the best I had encountered. (apart from the odd exception). I would love to make sufficient money to interest the taxman but in the meantime I have my own path. I do read what others have to say on the subject but tend to like the way I do things. I will put in the Daily Blogger this evening as I know that your thoughts resonate with many.

    Liked by 8 people

    • Thank you. I honestly don’t write to earn lots of money Sally, and I certainly don’t want any fame (had my dose of that with my newspaper column when readers would slam me up against the frozen veg counter in the local supermarket berating or extolling what I’d written the week before. but it’s such a thrill when someone buys your book and because you have poured so much love and effort into your books you want to share them with the world. 🙂

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    • Good post Lucinda. And thanks to Sally for saving me the effort of writing my own original comment! Ditto, Sally! I love my writing life, too. All the blogs, all the social media, podcasts, book tours, beta reading, reviewing, websites- bring it all on! Every day is a new wonderful creative adventure. But I suspect everyone who is reading this really does love it all,too. Right, Lucinda?

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      • There are days when I am happy to do it and others when all I want to do is get on with my latest book. I try not to get sidetracked chatting to all the amazing people I have met, but they are all (well almost) so nice 🙂

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      • Agree! And oh to be able to tweet with them, or Jane Austen or Charles Dickens! Seems like Charles may have loved all this social media- he was tuned in to his customers and readers, wasn’t he? Onward!

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  3. Your newsletter is funny but true. Sadly, the market is saturated and even some publishers aren’t doing much to market books either, just happy to to take their 70%. Now, if you can get your book on Radio 4 Book of The Week, you might get somewhere!!!

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  4. Oh, Lucinda, been there, done it, forked out the dollars! It all works to a lesser or greater degree while you are doing it. The moment you stop – say because you’d quite like to write a book – sales drop again. I haven’t done any marketing for many months – and it shows – because I am determined to get the goldfish memoir done this year.
    Good post which will resonate with many indie writers.

    Liked by 3 people

  5. Reblogged this on Frank Parker's author site and commented:
    I came to the conclusion a long time ago that the only people making money from indie publishing are those who profess to have the secret to finding readers. Only this morning I gt an offer that would guarantee lots of Amazon and Goodreads reviews, lots of tweets and iinclusion in a newsletter to 10s of thousands. The cost? $2,000 but if I’m quick I can have it all for just £1k. And all from an outfit whose own sales pitch just 4 days ago said that all that kind of stuff was a waste of money!

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Yes, yes and yes again. Think I’ll just batten down the hatches and get down to what I do best. Writing. Even my publisher implied as much, recently.
    Problem is, one just cannot resist just one more blog/tweet/post. It’s addictive, and the competitive/survival instinct is strong. So yet more time is wasted.
    Well written Lucinda!

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      • It’s not really competing, Lucinda. I don’t look at it that way. We’re all so different, and our books are unique. Maybe networking is the word: we help each other and make the world go round. It’s only the big publishers who are fuelled on money, who can afford to look at the industry in a totally competitive way.

        Liked by 1 person

  7. Doesn’t it remind you of the Kimberley diamond rush? The very, very few at the top made money – and boy did they have connections – the next tier down were not digging for corbonisedc stones but supplying the shovels, beer and the girls and the rest, at the rock face got very little at all.

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    • I bet Kimberly wasn’t one of those at the top who made pots of lolly, was she? I guess she must have been at the other end of the spectrum, one of the girls supplied to those at the rock face. Still, at least she got to be famous, having the mine named after her! 🙂

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  8. Well, I am not a writer but feel your pain and those of all the writers in the groups I belong to. I try to help promote but of course I am just one person. Does it cost for you to do give aways on goodread? Remember I still have 5 signed copies of “Walking Over Eggshells”.

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      • One of our major problems is we don’t know what works. Sales come in but were they from that mention in a blog, or you fiddled with the key words, or someone mentioning it to a friend at work or the result of that promo, giveaway or tweet or FB post etc etc etc.

        Liked by 1 person

      • True that. And it would seem that having a steady selling book in the market is akin to winning the lottery or being struck by lightning. It’s a chance thing with high odds against. I’ve finally reached the write to write and let the universe handle the rest stage. When the human element (promoters, gimmicks peddlers, paid reviewers, ad nauseum) cannot be relied on for results, I suppose all that is left is Divine guidance.

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      • You have a point there. I write because I have something to say, tales to tell that, unless I write them down, nobody will ever hear and, like the cultures I write about, will be lost to eternity. So I write for future generations, to show them some of the wonders that once existed in this glorious world but which now, even in my lifetime, are fast disappearing.. If anyone wants to read them, and fortunately a few do, great! But maybe one day a student of those cultures might find them interesting and of value and perhaps my great grandchildren can read them and learn about what their crazy ancestor did in the wilds of Africa before it all got taken over by ‘progress’.
        So I write, and if they sell they sell. If not, I’ve done what I set out to do.

        Liked by 2 people

      • A commendable stance on the importance of writing. I have no examples of such from my side of the family but three from my wife’s side. She had an ancestor who fought in the War Between the States, the losing side. He kept a detailed journal from his conscription, through the battle of Vicksburg and ending after the battle of Atlanta. Her great grandmother was published, a vignette of life in Appalachia. And an uncle wrote and published a book of poetry based on his life and adventures in the WWII merchant marines. We are fortunate to have copies of each to share with the younger generations..

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      • I have a book of poems from the late 1890s written by my great grandfather. When he died the family were too poor to afford his funeral so all the friends, for whom he had written poems over the years, collected them together and had them bound in a simple volume which they sold for one shilling each. This raised enough to pay for the funeral, make a beautiful five foot high engraved granite grave stone which still stands today, and give my great grandmother thirty pounds. That sum probably kept her going for five years.
        Few copies of the book remain, but I am pleased to say I have the one my grandfather had with him in the Somme. He wrote on the flyleaf the night before he led his men over the top on the first day and sent the book back to his sister in Scotland for safe keeping. He led his men over the top nine times during that hellish battle and somehow survived. Sadly he was gassed at Ypres, but lived on to 1924.

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      • The only books I ever give away gratis are ones I personally stick into someone’s hot sweaty paw. They have to be somewhat special to get that treatment or be someone of influence who might possibly get my books some exposure. It doesn’t often work, but Hey-ho, it was worth a try.

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      • I agree… now. I followed a few of those hucksters, promising to show the secret to catching lightning in a bottle but stopped when the results continued to hover at zero while the sales pitches increased exponentially. as momma used to say, “if at first you don’t succeed try, try again. But don’t be danged fool about it.”

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  9. Hi Susan, I gave 2 copies of WoE away recently on Goodreads and it cost me the postage and the cost of the books. No idea if sales were affected or not, except people have listed it as a book they are going to read. Thank you I’ll remember those signed copies you have. Maybe Firehouse might like to run a competition and award them as prizes? I think my cry from the heart was the frustration in doing everythnig else but write another book – all the marketing gets in the way – except of course we get to meet amazing people like yourself who are always so supportive. Thank you for that 🙂

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  10. Why, oh why have you put WALKING OVER EGGSHELLS last on your list? It’s a brilliant book and one that everyone, and i mean EVERYONE should read before all the others. It’s important stuff that even explains the impossible – by this I mean it explains Donald Wotsit in America. More than that’ it explains why so many people lack confidence to go out in the world and shine when they are quite capable of doing so. You did.

    As for the rest of your post, sadly I have to agree with you. I too have tried most of the things you suggest, wondering long afterwards if I gave up too early or whether I was just crap at whatever it was. I came to the conclusion the latter was right.

    I have, however, got one idea that has yet to be tried. All my books have been published as e-books and POD and this seems to impede uptake by high street bookshops. They like to deal with wholesalers who have a returns policy, something which doesn’t exist with the POD market. So, I wonder if printing up a stock of my books and placing them with a wholesaler might give me an inroad to the market. While I’m at it perhaps I should go the whole hog and make my printing a hardback issue. Then I might have at least a small chance that some prominent reviewer in the national press might have a look at it. They do not look at paperbacks, so their editors inform me.

    Apart from that your guess is as good as mine. Hey-ho.

    Liked by 1 person

    • That might be an answer Ian, but I thought of buying in a stack of WoE in Spanish and taking them round to the local bookshops here, but by the time I have paid for them and the postage, and the bookshop takes a cut I reckoned I would be working in minus figures!! And thank you for your kind words about Walking over Eggshells, pity you don’t work for Book Bub 😦

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      • They are not what might today be recognised as good poems, being mainly acrostics and similar, but quite typical of their era. Most poets these days would turn their noses up at them, I suspect. Nevertheless, they were great Grandad’s work and give at least a tenuous contact down the years, along with odd things like a photo, his walking cane, an old nickel plated Albert watch chain, minus watch and fob, and his writing slope which I still use.

        After five years of military service, which all the men in our family did since 1777, he had become a wholesale grocer. He eventually ended up in Wishaw, just outside Glasgow, running a small corner grocery shop with a bar on one side. Like all Scots, I think he liked a dram.

        I don’t think the poems are worth republishing, but I have written down all I know in my family history book, so that my daughter and her descendants will know about him. He too served in Africa, but his was doing military service in South Africa, from where he came back with some bug in his system which never left him. All the same I get the impression he was quite a decent bloke.

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  11. If I was to spend that much time on twitter facebook pinterest linkedin there wouldn’t be any time left to write the bloody book. Thank God I’m not trying to write for a living…I’d be starving and homeless…and wouldn’t be able to afford the paper to print it or the laptop to type it on . Jaysis :p

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  12. I’m sure she enjoyed a lot of success while she was still alive, but maybe I’m mean, but it’s a depressing thought watching my great grandchildren swanning around the oceans on their mega yachts on my late royalties

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  13. Honestly, the majority of sales I have gotten have come from face-to-face interactions. So…yeah…very few. Writing is great, the chance of fame and fortune is a wonderful dream–but don’t lose your day job.

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  14. Dear Lucinda,

    How well you have put it/said it all. But we keep going: do not think we are masochistic just hopeful. What would life be without hope?

    Your books are great and you deserve success.

    So far have not found anything that works for my books but I will go on trying.

    Thank you for sharing these thoughts with humour and giving me a laugh. Very therapeutic.

    Liked by 2 people

  15. My favorite parts of this post were “Christian Romance” and “friends that probably don’t even read”. I really enjoyed this post. It was so honest that I felt your pain about the social media tactics to get in front of your audience. I hate those social media accounts with 20k+ followers, but only follow 200. It’s like “Really? This is so fake.” 😊😊😊

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  16. Hi Lucinda, So much truth written in jest. I resonated and identified with every word you wrote. I don’t know why we do this and to put ourselves out there, which is so opposite of what we want to do. Loved reading your blog and had a good laugh.

    Liked by 1 person

    • That is such a loively thing to say Victoria, thank you. As for SEO, of I google me, then I come up for pages. Before I chose a pen name I did a lit of research to see if anyone else had that name deliberately for that purpose.- so visibility is the key and a microscopic part of the world has ever heard of Lucinda E Clarke or Victoria Benchley I guess. Still we scribble on yes? 🙂

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  17. Oh so illuminating! Makes you wonder how all those books got to be out there – did all the authors pay a fortune out of their own pockets? I was made an offer to publish a small print run if I contributed to the cost – a paltry sum of AUD 5,000. Who has that kind of spare cash lying around ?!

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  18. Amen! Most of what I do these days is try and share other people’s books, review books, translations and writing. And reading blog posts (I’m writing fewer now, other than to share reviews). I do have the first books in my two series available free and those bring the odd sale (it seems some people eventually get to read them and want to know what happens next, especially in my YA series) but randomly some days I might have 300 of the free downloads without doing anything at all, others 4. (I imagine somebody might have shared it somewhere. Spanish free downloads doing well in Brazil. Go figure!). By the way, I’ve joined some Spanish authors and we’re having a Festival of books and reading http://literania.global/
    Your comment about getting your books in Spanish made me think about it. I hope to be manning the stall for the authors who can’t be there personally. At least I’ll have plenty to read! Best of luck!

    Liked by 1 person

  19. I published three books with a major NY publisher and they did zero marketing. This is true for most companies. They pick the best sellers ahead of time to throw money at. So going the agent and “real” publisher route leaves the writer in a similar spot, taking over the marketing.

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    • I’ve heard that so many times before. If I thought a publisher / agent would do a tenth of what I have tried, I’d be on the doorstep of each and every one. Not only that, but the harder you work at it, and the more you sell through your own efforts, they take part of the profits for doing nothing past the launch stage. It’s a lose/lose situation whichever way you look at it.

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      • I think with publishers like that you need clauses in your contract the spell out precisely what marketing the publisher will and will not do. If it isn’t satisfactory, don’t sign up, however desperate you are to get published. It’s not easy, I know, but that’s how it needs to be.

        I have made that mistake, so I know what I’m talking about. 😦

        Liked by 1 person

  20. It can be done, and it can be done without spending more money than you make in royalties. The best advice I can offer is to try and have fun with your promotional efforts. Keep writing and keep plugging your books ♥

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  21. I agree with this article. Sometimes the writers who really need to be “seen,” are the ones who are off somewhere actually writing… (GASP!) It can be quite eye opening to realize that writing a book is relatively easy, as compared to finding an audience. A dose of reality! Thank you for this post!

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  22. One can only conclude that no one really knows what works infallibly. I did read a comment that marketing should be about self-definition, not self-promotion, which would make it less of a chore.

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  23. You ask where to find them, Lucinda? I believe Mr google knows where to find my website, so just type in my name and it should come up. I’m told Mr Amazon also knows as he/she/it sells occasional copies as does Smashwords. I believe they are listed on B&N and a number of other internet sales outlets. Like most other people”s, my books aren’t difficult to find when you know to look for them. The problem lies in making enough people aware of them and generating that spark of enthusiasm that makes people want to read.

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    • Ah but people want immediate links to click Ian they rarely go searching in the immediate world. Can you drop me a list of the books with the Amazon link for each or maybe one with a B&n or iTunes link, that will be a big help. 🙂

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  24. I hear you, loud and clear. It’s frustrating and draining… but oh, the rush when some anonymous person responds and buys a book! If only we knew which of our twenty strategies had attracted them!

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  25. Brilliant post, Lucinda! I laughed out loud, but recognise everything of the anguish…and the worst thing is that even the prozac and valium cost you your royalties!! Seriously, the conclusion seems to be luck! Sure, you have to put effort in as well, but if she hadn’t hit the write spot at the right moment, even JK Rowling wouldn’t have made it. Sadly, luck is not something we have any control over. Just keep writing your great books, be the lovely and fun person you are here, and eventually the rest will (or won’t) do itself. You’ve already left your mark with all those who have read your books! I have ceased caring much about marketing my own books. I do what I can and as long as I am not paying for it, I’ll do it, but I cannot do a huge amount due to my day job. That said, I love supporting other writers with theirs, so you can count on me!

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  26. Val! that is such a lovely thing to say, thank you soooo much, i’m sitting here all pink (my face that is). I must write somethnig positive for next week, what aboyt I sold a book this year ha ha 🙂 And you are so supportive, after ‘competing’ in an industry where we were colleagues, this industry if you can call it that generates friends instead and that is so much nicer. BTW I’m reading yuor Eccentrics at the moment and thoroughly enjoying it 🙂

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  27. Lucinda Clarke Time is the most precious gift we have in Life. My opinion is: Do whatever makes you happy. But don’t do it for the money. Because money is not everything. If you enjoy writing keep going. Fact is whether you make a fortune with your books or not, you won’t be here forever. You also won’t take the money with you.
    But you leave a legacy with your passion and talent. If you are lucky you will be discovered while you are still here. But you may also be discovered when you’re gone like many worldwide known artists and writers.
    In my opinion the more you focus on sales the more miserable you become as an Author. Forget the damn money!!! Be creative, be productive and most importantly be grateful for the gift you have. You can’t force success! If it is meant to be it will be. Change your attitude and you will see that the Universe will reward you.

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    • Yes I agree with all that Lily, but if you don’t make an effort, then your books will never be seen and enjoyed. I’m not manic about making money – I’m blessed I don’t need book sales to pay the basic bills, I’m living off a pension which is the product of my career in writing. This was a fun piece about all the hoops we jump through to get sales, and while I like to think it doesn’t matter, the thought of peeping down through the clouds and seeing my gg grandchildren floating about on their mega yacht bought from my royalites when I would like to order one tomorrow for ME!!!!! 🙂 🙂 well, I’m only human.

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    • I’ve booked my cloud seat in the front row beside the balcony, so I can look down through the hole in the clouds and throw peanuts at my descendants as they revel in my success! Or if thet doesn’t happen, to remind them I was an oernery old bugger!

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  28. Doesn’t anyone just write because they like writing anymore? Is it all about sales? Before Kindle publishing and the popping up of 5 more independent ‘publishers’ (and I use the term loosely) every day, 99.999% of writers never had any chance of being published. Look at it this way – now, the reading public get a CHANCE to read us, not like 10+ years ago when our novels remained in manuscript folders. We’re in a GREAT postion now. I do get that this was a fun post, not a serious moan, but only because it says so in the comment above ~ my first reaction was, crikey, how negative is this lady??!! I was pleased to read that it was meant in a tongue in cheek way, I must say!!

    I first wrote novels in the 1990s. I now self-pub (by choice; I don’t submit to publishers). I am reasonably successful, in that I have a modest regular readership and lots of reviews, because I submit to book bloggers, and have built up my readership over time (book bloggers are excellent, btw). What I earn will only ever be ‘a bit extra’, not enough to live on, but it bothers me not. I shook my head in sadness the other day, when I read a blog post entitled ’20 top tips for new writers’. It was all about how to promote and sell your book. I think numbers 19 and 20 sneaked in a little mention about making sure the book was proofread, and that you can actually write in the first place…..

    I hope you find a way that works for you, Lucinda! 🙂

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    • Now that is something that had not occurred to me. Those who have been following my blog for ages know I am seldom serious and that it was totally tongue in cheek! I seldom mention my books and writing in my blogs, most times they are history and travel. Never take me seriously Lily, I’m not a moaner. 🙂 it was a fun blog.

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    • Terry it was tongue in cheek, I’m seldom that serious that’s why I sprinkle my posts with smiley faces. I’ve been amazed it stuck a chord with so many writers. And yes, for one I’m certainly not moaning that we have the opportunity to self pub, like you I’ve been traditionally published by the Big 5 in the past but choose to go it alone – only I’m not alone, there’s a fabulous crowd of friends out there and we’re sharing the same experiences. I read one brave post the other day focusing on the topic of a book being good enough, not just typos, grammar but story, plots, research etc. But it’s the only one I have ever seen.

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