#Author Do you need a push for your campaign or promotion? Try Headtalk

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Lit World Interviews

Hi all:

If you recall, a few weeks back I wrote about the advantages of joining in multi-author promotional campaigns (read the post here) and one of them was the fact that you could learn from other authors.

Today, thanks to another multi-author event I’m taking part in (an audiobook giveaway for Thanksgiving), I’ve discovered something called HeadTalker. It seems to work in a similar way to Thunderclap (although I’ve never used Thunderclap), the idea being that you can set up a campaign, and ask other people to provide you support, via sharing on social media (Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr and LinkedIn, although they can choose to share everywhere or only on some of them). You have to choose a goal, a number of people who has to offer their support, and if you reach that number, then on a set name and time, your message (the campaign…

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THE BIG TRIP FURTHER ON

Sadly I waved goodbye to the ellies, counting my fingers and toes in the car on the way down the hill to make sure I wasn’t a missing a bit. (Yes, I know elephants are vegetarian). We’d heard some horrific stories about the bad treatment some of them had suffered at the hands of their owners and one poor beast was hobbling around on three legs after stepping on a landmine. I was, however, only suffering from a sore toe. I’d watched the handlers smashing those large watermelons on the ground before feeding them to the elephants. That looks easy I thought what fun, and tried it as well – result, a bruised foot. I guess it takes practice and some spare feet.

We returned to our very posh hotel in Chiang Mai through the rush hour traffic which was quite horrendous

and the largest suite we’d stayed in for a long time. We could have hired a courier to pass messages from one end to the other. Don’t you just love the condoms on offer?

Just across the road we investigated this market with all kinds of interesting food on sale.

But wimpishly, we saw an Irish tavern and treated ourselves to some very European steak and potatoes, which was a change from the rice and vegetable diet more typical of the Far East.

Some beautiful, tall women came and greeted us, gorgeously dressed. I could have kicked myself later when DGH explained (in rather pompous tones I thought) they were examples of the transvestites who are common in the city. I didn’t take pictures! They hovered for a while and perhaps they were hoping to earn a few dollars by posing for the diners. I think we were the only diners there who weren’t local residents.

Now William probably didn’t notice the industrial revolution. He was too busy in his palace siring 10 illegitimate children. He attempted to sire at least 1 legitimate heir, but that didn’t work out too well. Mind, by the time he became king at the age of 64, he was probably getting a bit past it. Two of his children born on the wrong side of the blanket had died. He had them all with his mistress an actress (still a rather scandalous occupation in those days) Dorothea Jordan (born Dora Bland) with whom he lived with for twenty years.

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I get a hint here that he wasn’t terribly fond of his wife. To begin with it was an arranged marriage to begat an heir, and even before the union William had written to his eldest son, “She is doomed, poor dear innocent young creature, to be my wife.”

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I think she must have been quite easy going to accept the marriage – it came with a hefty sum of money from parliament but since William was 27 years older than her, Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen spent many happy hours in Marks and Spencers spending most of it. On good days she popped into Harrods, especially at sale time.

Have a great week, a safe Halloween and don’t forget my new book comes out on Thursday the 3rd in the Amie series – Stolen Future, which is on pre-order right now.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01M67NRG4  But another blog about that nearer the time.

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My guest blog at Helen Hollick’s amazing blog ofhistoryandkings.blogspot.co.uk/

Another great book from Christoph fischer

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Here is my guest blog, published at Helen Hollick’s https://ofhistoryandkings.blogspot.co.uk/2016/10/was-surviving-wwii-luck-for-some.html

Was surviving WWII Luck for some?

“Luck” .. in “The Luck of the Weissensteiners”

my Tuesday Talk Guest, Christoph Fischer
Fiction about any war is rarely a light-hearted enterprise. Although there are many publications on the subject out there, I was amazed at the new angles and perspectives I discovered during my research for the project. Especially a war as big as World War II, with such a long duration and with so many theatres, makes it hard to think of the endless number of private misfortunes and life-altering events and new circumstances.
It is easy to forget about the smaller ‘players’ in the political arena and the people whose lives don’t fit into the broad categories of sufferers we know about. Was surviving the war really “luck” for some? For many countries in the east of Europe the ‘liberation’ by…

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How to Network Your Blog: 10/25/16

If anyone would re-blog my latest post about my new release, I would be over the moon!! I think I’m connected to everyone on the list above.

Dream Big, Dream Often

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Here’s how to network your blog. The work is done for you, all you have to do is LIKE, COMMENT and FOLLOW others.  The more you network with other blogs, the more other blogs will network with you!

(click How to Network Your Blog to view yesterday’s post)

Tales From the Cabbage Patch

Ann Cavitt Fisher

Moore To Say

Insane Roots

Lucky Otter’s Haven

Rendezvous En New York

Peace from Panic

Getting Fit for Forty

Second Wind Leisure Perspectives

Being Lydia

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WHAT YOU HAVE ALL BEEN WAITING FOR – (WELL MAYBE)

Finally, the next Amie book is complete and up for pre-order.  Publication date is 3rd November. Priced at $2.99

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http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01M67NRG4

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B01M67NRG4

http://www.amazon.com.au/dp/B01M67NRG4

Amie returns to her beloved Africa and a settled life, but her enemies have neither forgiven nor forgotten her. They are determined to take their revenge and reclaim their honour. The events of one night change everything, leaving her with no home, no friends and no name; no future. Suddenly she no longer exists and those controlling her make it clear; she either obeys or she dies.
Stolen Future is the third book in the ‘Amie’ series – international multi award winning #1 bestsellers on both sides of the Atlantic. From naive, newly-married housewife, Amie faces challenges that change her beliefs and behaviour beyond all recognition.
A fast-paced action adventure, page turning read set in the wilds of Africa in the modern day.

That’s the official blurb, but it will make sense even if you’ve not read the first two books in the series. It’s best to read them in order as you can see how Amie matures as a person and faces the various challenges head on. And she certainly has plenty to face, people wanting to kill her, wild animals that are dangerous and someone who has taken a very unhealthy interest in her!

 

Whoops! I was going to make all those award thingies a bit smaller, but WordPress won’t co-operate – well you get the picture even if it is a bit overbearing!

THE BIG TRIP SOME NUMBER OR OTHER

Yes, I’ve got a bit confused with the numbering system and if I didn’t have the itinerary here, I wouldn’t remember where we went next.

After breakfast it was off to another airport and another flight. As I’ve mentioned before I love flying and I could quite easily get used to hopping on and off planes. Besides being a writer, my next choice would have been a career as a stewardess, but then, the family were not in favour of that either.  We flew from Luang Prabang to Chiang Mai. I’m not sure if news had got back to China where our tour operator was domiciled – about those two old codgers who were looking totally knackered –  but they allowed us several hours of leisure time in Chiang Mai at this smart hotel

and a delightful evening wandering around a very nice night market.

Next day it we were off to see the elephants. No, not to ride on them, or watch them perform but to care for them. Despite the fact they were Indian elephants and much smaller than their African cousins, to me were still very large.

We were given melons to feed to them, initially we were behind a metal barrier then they took us out in the open and encouraged us to pat them and make friends.

I remembered the ranger I met in Chobe who took visitors out to meet this one friendly elephant. He’d shake hands with it to the delight and wonder of the admiring tourists. Until, the day he chose the wrong elephant. It crushed his hand to pulp.

These are different elephants I told myself, not daring to think of the time we’d been charged by one. These have been rescued from the streets where they were mis-used by their owners to beg for money, or made to give rides for hours or work in the logging camps. This was an elephant refuge where they were well fed and well treated.

After lunch we all trekked down to the river to give them a nice bath. Personally, I thought DH was very rude, remarking that my bucket throwing was not up to par, and if I stood at that distance from the leviathans, the water would never reach them.

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I got as close as I dared. I’ve not lived this long to take unnecessary chances.

So, we are up to William IV gracing the throne of England. (I guess there were 3 other Williams before him at some time, you would have to check back). He reigned at what came to be known as the start of the industrial revolution. This came about from the instruction of the steam kettle, useful for making cups of tea. Sir Robert Louise Stevenson put wheels on them and turned them into trains and other useful things.

SO EXCITING!!

Gabi Plumm has put up the opening of the first in the series, Amie an Africa Adventure on uTube. When I listened to it I thought – goodness, did I write that!

The first of my video/audio excerpts for Lucinda E Clark’s books is here.
The one is for Amie, An African Adventure a book that is available on Amazon here: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00LWFIO5K
Here is the link to You tube and the first-ever published audio/video for this book.: https://youtu.be/oM4MReLjaMI
Have a listen then get this great adventure thriller.
You won’t be disappointed.

Amie an African Adventure
Just an ordinary girl, living in an ordinary town, with nothing but ordinary ambitions, Amie Fish is plunged into hot water when her husband gets posted to a country she’s never heard of. Amie’s ability to adapt and make a life for herself in equatorial Togodo, lands her in more trouble that she could have imagined, her life is threatened and everything she holds dear is ripped away from her.
AMAZON.CO.UK

Review: Walking Over Eggshells: Surviving Mental Abuse by Lucinda E Clarke

When Angels Fly

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Walking Over Eggshells: Surviving Mental Abuse by Lucinda E Clarke

I have just finished reading “Walking Over Eggshells: Surviving Mental Abuse” by Lucinda E. Clarke and my review will follow Clarke’s book blurb on Amazon.

“Walking Over Eggshells is an autobiography that tells the story of a mentally abused child, who married a “Walter Mitty” clone. They moved from England to Kenya, from Libya to Botswana and on again to South Africa. It took all her courage to survive in situations that were at times dangerous, sometimes humorous, but always nerve wracking. She had a variety of jobs, different types of homes, and was both a millionairess and totally broke. She met royalty, hosted ambassadors, and won numerous awards for her writing and television programs. She also climbed over garbage dumps, fended off bailiffs, and coped being abandoned in the African bush with a seven-week-old baby with no money or…

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THE BIG TRIP – MOST MEMORABLE MOMENT

I think the most emotional moment I had on the whole of the Big Trip was the reason I had set my alarm clock for 5.30 am. I had mentioned to our guide that it was on the itinerary we would be taken to the morning alms giving ritual, and, as we were leaving the next morning, when would we see this? It was obvious he wasn’t going to rise at that hour, but told me I could simply walk outside our hotel and see it from there at 5.30.

So there I stood, camera in hand in the dark, shivering. Remember this is Luang Prabang in Laos, which is pretty far north, and we’d brought minimal winter clothes.

As the sun began to lighten the sky there appeared out of the mist three young monks. A few people were sitting at the roadside by now and as the monks passed they accepted offerings into the basket each one carried.

A pile of food had been left outside one house, so they paused, and in unison, chanted for a few minutes before moving on, their orange clad figures disappearing into the early morning mist.

By now I had been joined by another couple from the hotel and I was debating whether to go back and crawl back into a warm bed, but for some reason, decided to stay. I was so glad I did.

A slow procession turned the corner at the end of the road, distant orange figures who walked towards us. There must have been 30 or 40 of them, ranging in age from fairly elderly men to young boys possibly as young as seven. Not a word was spoken, nothing said. I snapped one picture after another and then felt very guilty, as if I was taking a typical tourist advantage of a holy and almost private moment of their daily lives. I felt an intruder. Yet I couldn’t help myself, I had to get a record of this moment – to remind me of what I’d seen.

I wanted to somehow give the message that I was more than a nosy tourist, so as the last monk was approaching, I hesitantly offend him some American dollars. I just hoped he wouldn’t be offended, and I wasn’t sure I was doing the right thing. He looked at me, then opened his basket and held it out. I saw it was full of food and I paused, remembering what we’ve all been told about money and germs. I placed it inside as gently as I could, and then stepped back. He looked up at me and said “Thank you,” and he smiled.

In the cold light of a Spanish evening, this may sound trite, but in that early morning in Laos, I felt my soul move.

Next week i meet elephants.

Have a great week.

My Editor

I am not the only one flying to the United States next month. My dear friend (she has become a really good friend) Gabi Plumm is also going to America with her partner Peter Marsh. Why? Because they have been invited to showcase two of their films at the Friday Harbour Festival on St Juan Island Washington state. Cousins across the sea and the first Skeletons in the Cupboard have been chosen to be screened. (You can check them out below).

Gabi Plumm

Not sure how I first connected with Gabi, through social media of course as we’ve never met (she is in Cairns Australia and I’m in Spain)  – but it’s on the cards. I count her as one of my most supportive friends.

A little bit about Gabi.

Born in the UK, Gabi spent many years in France and Spain before emigrating to Australia, in 1987.

Gabi’s history is marked by the astonishing discovery, aged 34, that she’d been adopted and obviously, never told. The ensuing quest for her birth parents lead Gabi into unexpected waters, and finding her mother, a sister and two brothers, gave her a sense of identity and place, she’d never had before. With the understanding of the source of her talents, abilities, and leanings, she set about writing her memoir —rather badly as she now admits— but once written, the catharsis of the autobiography Registered Under Another Name (2007) sparked an ongoing interest in writing and editing. She has also written a series of eight children’s stories entitled The Two Jays of Dribblepit which languishes like so many others, in Amazon’s darkest corners.

I have read these and they are great, so check them out! Perfect for kids aged around 9.     https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00OUSZC4W

The Two Jays of Dribblepit: Book 1: The Present, the Dog and the Drain by [Plumm, Gabi, Phillips, Liam]

With two grown sons who are Professional Tennis Coaches living in America, and a partner, Peter, with whom she makes documentary films, Gabi has found time to consolidate her talents by achieving a Bachelor of Arts in Creative Writing, specialising in Editing. These talents she put towards scriptwriting for their films (details below), in which she also performs as narrator and presenter, as well as editing a variety of manuscripts and websites.

In her spare time, she runs a small B & B and teaches Pickleball to ex-tennis players who, like her, can no longer charge about a tennis court or handle over-arm serving.

This is Gabi’s author page. https://www.amazon.com/Gabi-Plumm/e/B00NO7B0CS

The growing list of authors she loves to work for is small but special, and her documentary films about the early people of the Pacific continue to glean thousands of views and comments daily.

Films:

Aboriginal Pride (2012)

Cousins Across the Sea, The Director’s Cut (2013)

New Zealand: Skeletons in the Cupboard. Episode 1: The Redheads (2015)

Skeletons in the Cupboard, Episode 2: Under the Carpet (2016)

So we also have a filming background in common, and she understands my strange use of commas in all the wrong places! For every edit she has gone the extra mile, and is currently recording book trailers for all my books – and I never even asked her!

Sadly, we’ll miss each other in America – miles apart and the wrong dayes, but one day Gabi …!

Lucinda